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Changing the Climate

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Biodiversity

Tales from the South Pacific: Huahine

Ashley Sendell-Price The island of Huahine (in fact two islands: Huahine Nui and Huahine Iti) is often described as the Garden of Eden, enticing tourists with its lush forested landscape, turquoise lagoons (pictured below) and white-sand beaches. Although I do agree that... Continue Reading →

Tales from the South Pacific: Mo’orea

Ashley Sendell-Price After a year of planning and 53 hours of travelling I arrived on Mo’orea; the first of five French Polynesian islands that I will be visiting over a two-month period as part of my DPhil. I am here... Continue Reading →

Squid, scuba diving and fish dissections

Christina Hunt Squid, scuba diving and fish dissections. Those three things sum up my undergraduate fieldwork in Honduras, Central America. I was based on the tropical island paradise of Utila, where during the summer months a small dive centre transitions... Continue Reading →

The Promiscuous Life of the Superb Fairy-Wren

Fiona Jones The Superb Fairy-Wren. Its name makes it sound delicate, yet majestic, and – well – sweet. But, names can be misleading… Beneath this rather lovely title lies the most promiscuous bird of all, with 95% of broods and... Continue Reading →

Avian migration since Aristotle: How ‘wearable tech’ is shaping our understanding of where birds go

Ashley Sendell - Price Humans have long been aware of the seasonal comings and goings of bird populations. But for centuries much of what was known about where birds went was based on speculation, and thus often lead to conclusions... Continue Reading →

Flight of the Waggle Dancers

Fiona Jones I don’t know if you know this, but honey bees do a ‘waggle dance’. An actual dance. Called the ‘waggle dance’. The first time I learnt about this, I found it pretty amazing, and to be honest I... Continue Reading →

Following the leader: decision making in shoals

Sarah Lucas How does a shoal of fish decide where it’s going? Collections of animals like shoals of fish or flocks of birds are clearly able to make decisions about where to go when seeking out food or shelter, without... Continue Reading →

An Extreme Survivor

Fiona Jones As the nights draw in and the mince pies are (almost) ready to come out, we’re bracing ourselves for the onset of some chilly weather. But next time you wish you’d packed an extra jumper, spare a thought... Continue Reading →

The Oxford Dodo

Fiona Jones For me, the dodo (Raphus cucullatus) is as intimately associated with the city of Oxford as the dreaming spires, or an afternoon spent punting on the Cherwell. Its plump form famously decorates the pages of Alice’s Adventures in... Continue Reading →

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