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Changing the Climate

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Dynamic Earth

Could you survive a pyroclastic flow?

Frey Fyfe Among the many hazards posed by subduction zone volcanoes, some of the deadliest and most viscerally terrifying are pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), ground-hugging clouds of gas and fragmented magma (ash) that can reach temperatures of 1000°C. The very... Continue Reading →

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China’s Dusty History

Kaja Fenn Loess deposits are a type of sediment formed from tiny dust particles. They can cover hundreds of square kilometres and are found worldwide. The really cool thing about these deposits, and one of their more prominent characteristics, is... Continue Reading →

So Hot Right Now: Triggered

Amber L. Madden-Nadeau The explosion of Krakatau in 1883 attracted a significant amount of attention, as discussed in my previous blog: The Explosive Roars of Krakatau. You would be forgiven, therefore, for believing that we’ve discovered all there is to... Continue Reading →

The Carbon Conundrum

Ben Fernando All life on Earth is ‘organic’, in that it has a biochemistry based on the element carbon. Carbon forms the molecular backbone of every biologically important complex molecule, from the DNA nucleotides which encode our genetic information, to... Continue Reading →

So hot right now: My first volcano

Amber L. Madden-Nadeau As we approached Krakatau by boat, it was hard to believe that this was the site of the catastrophic eruption in 1883 that killed around 35,000 people. All of the islands were very much alive: green and... Continue Reading →

So Hot Right Now: The Explosive Roars of Krakatau

Amber L. Madden-Nadeau The title of this piece was taken from an eye witness account of the 1883 eruption of Krakatau Volcano, Indonesia, which is possibly one of the most famous volcanic episodes of all time (Figure 1). The A.D.... Continue Reading →

The Alpine Fault – It’s what’s on the inside that counts

Rellie Goddard You’re told from a young age that you can’t judge a book by its cover. It’s what’s inside that counts, true beauty comes from within, etc. Given the nature of my PhD, which looks at processes occurring deep... Continue Reading →

Can you trust a map?

Kaja Fenn Maps… They can be very simple or almost a work of art. We use them in our phones for sightseeing, in sat navs for directions, and the “old school” paper way when hiking. They can describe the terrain... Continue Reading →

“San Francisco is going to get hit again and it’s going to be an even bigger monster this time…” ‘San Andreas’ movie, 2015

Rellie Goddard It’s an odd thing to admit, but I’m obsessed with faults. Irrespective of their shape or size, I find the deformation that manifests the movement of our continental plates fascinating (though I’d prefer them if they didn’t result... Continue Reading →

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