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Changing the Climate

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Dynamic Earth

So Hot Right Now: The Explosive Roars of Krakatau

Amber L. Madden-Nadeau The title of this piece was taken from an eye witness account of the 1883 eruption of Krakatau Volcano, Indonesia, which is possibly one of the most famous volcanic episodes of all time (Figure 1). The A.D.... Continue Reading →

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The Alpine Fault – It’s what’s on the inside that counts

Rellie Goddard You’re told from a young age that you can’t judge a book by its cover. It’s what’s inside that counts, true beauty comes from within, etc. Given the nature of my PhD, which looks at processes occurring deep... Continue Reading →

Can you trust a map?

Kaja Fenn Maps… They can be very simple or almost a work of art. We use them in our phones for sightseeing, in sat navs for directions, and the “old school” paper way when hiking. They can describe the terrain... Continue Reading →

“San Francisco is going to get hit again and it’s going to be an even bigger monster this time…” ‘San Andreas’ movie, 2015

Rellie Goddard It’s an odd thing to admit, but I’m obsessed with faults. Irrespective of their shape or size, I find the deformation that manifests the movement of our continental plates fascinating (though I’d prefer them if they didn’t result... Continue Reading →

So hot right now: A tale of two lovers

Amber L. Madden-Nadeau Popocatepetl - more colloquially known as “Popo” – means “smoking mountain” and is an active volcano just 60 km from Mexico City (Figure 1) with 20 million people living within this catchment area. It stands right next... Continue Reading →

So Hot Right Now: Volcanology 101

Amber L. Madden-Nadeau A volcano is defined as “a naturally occurring vent or fissure at the Earth's surface through which erupt molten, solid, and gaseous materials”.  Volcanoes come in many different shapes and sizes and have many different eruptive styles. They... Continue Reading →

Nepal – the inability to ‘shake it off’

Rellie Goddard On the 25th of April 2015, a Mw1 7.8 earthquake, known as Gorkha, ripped through the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) just 77 km north-west of the country’s capital, Kathmandu1. This event propagated a colossal 160 km to the east-south-east, killing... Continue Reading →

Traces in the sand

Brooke Jonson What can you learn about an ancient world just by looking at the rocks?  Quite a lot as it happens. In 2011, I was patrolling a childhood fossiling location when I found the slab in figure 1. I... Continue Reading →

Outer Worlds: The Incredible Geodiversity of Pluto and Charon

Lucy Kissick When NASA made the decision in 2000 to visit the Solar System’s only unexplored planet (as it was designated at the time), they knew they were in for a long journey. Pluto and its sister world Charon form... Continue Reading →

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