The Anatomy of a Grad Students Desk… Frey

Frey Fyfe, a creature native to the coasts of East Devon, and previously misidentified as a Greater Horseshoe Bat, is here described as a subspecies of Vulcanoptera minor, the Lesser Spotted Volcanologist. While mostly active at night, the Frey can sometimes be seen emerging from their roost in time for mid-morning tea and coffee, and... Continue Reading →

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The Anatomy of a Grad Students Desk… Rellie

Common name: Rellie Goddard Taxonomy: Subterra troglodytes (DPhil Structural Geology) Rellie Goddard is an underground creature, most often found listening to 90s music in the basement, while trying to make her rocks shiny. Like most creatures attracted to shiny things, the Rellie is also a scavenger. No food is safe around this post-grad, though any... Continue Reading →

The Anatomy of a Grad Students Desk… Matt

Common Name: Matt Brown Taxonomy: Atmosphericus progamiatus Passing the Atmospheric Ocean and Planetary Physics (AOPP) building late at night, you may, if lucky, spy a wide-eyed inquisitive face, peering furtively into the sky from one of the high windows, the soft strains of pop punk music wafting in the quiet night. Don’t be alarmed, this is... Continue Reading →

The Anatomy of a Grad Students Desk… Brooke

Common Name: Brooke Johnson Taxonomy: Anthrolithicus maximus (DPhil Geology) Brooke Johnson, aka the Giant Northern Rock Fondler, can be found haunting places as remote and desolate as Australia’s Northern Territories and the North Yorkshire Coast. His dismal cry of “BLOODY HELL LOOK AT THE SIZE OF THIS NODULE” can be heard echoing around the landscape,... Continue Reading →

Knowing when to let go

Rellie Goddard I have spent the last two weeks residing in the wonderful city of Durham where I was lucky enough to spend four years of my life completing first a BSc and then an MRes.  Now living in Oxford and working in an entirely different area of structural geology, it would be a fair... Continue Reading →

Tales from the South Pacific: Huahine

Ashley Sendell-Price The island of Huahine (in fact two islands: Huahine Nui and Huahine Iti) is often described as the Garden of Eden, enticing tourists with its lush forested landscape, turquoise lagoons (pictured below) and white-sand beaches. Although I do agree that this island is by far the most beautiful I have visited, for me Huahine lacks an... Continue Reading →

Tales from the South Pacific: Mo’orea

Ashley Sendell-Price After a year of planning and 53 hours of travelling I arrived on Mo’orea; the first of five French Polynesian islands that I will be visiting over a two-month period as part of my DPhil. I am here to study the silvereye, Zosterops lateralis, a small passerine bird that was introduced to French Polynesia... Continue Reading →

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